Photo of the week – Butterfly

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Butterfly

Butterflies are so beautiful. But oh so hard to capture with my 24-105 mm L Canon lens on my Tanzania Safari. They come in so many different colors, sizes, textures, shapes, etc.  And they have some lovely names like white pansy and emperor. So fun to watch these pretty little flying creatures.

On my Walking Safari in Private Serengeti, I had the chance to capture a few a shots as I had the advantage of going slow.  My guide Richard and ranger Deo all got into it with me and helped me track down butterflies. This is one of my best captures. Look at that beauty. Anyone know the name of this butterfly species?

Wildlife photographer Russell MacLaughlin recently had one of this photos on Africa Geographic Twitter feed and I commented on how I had difficultly capturing these beauties and he replied, ‘not easy at all”.  The quest to capture these beauty continues.

Life worth Exploring! ™ Make memories on your Journey To Africa Safari.

Get in touch //
Email – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Call – 1.877.558.6288 / 713.592.6228 [outside US]
Form – Request Information

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Photo of the week – Southern Ground Hornbill

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Watch out! I am landing.

Birds! Birds! Who knew each one had so much personality. My fifth reason for loving Serengeti.

This pair of Southern Ground Hornbill was spotted in Northern Serengeti. These large birds are ground feeders and feed on snakes, tortoise, frogs, lizards and such. The group which consists of up to 11 hornbills are very vocal. Some even go far as saying lion-like.

The elder Southern Ground Hornbill tend to help the inexperienced young breed [co-breeders].  The couple, usually monogamous, will lay about 2-3 eggs every 9 years or so. 1 egg will usually survive. The male will tend the nest with eggs which they build on tree cavities.  Team working birds! The group work together to tend the young.

Life worth Exploring! ™ Make memories on your Journey To Africa Safari.

Get in touch //
Email – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Call – 1.877.558.6288 / 713.592.6228 [outside US]
Form – Request Information

 

Photo of the week – Impala in Tarangire

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Oh my. What a handsome boy!

This mighly male impala was spotted in splendid Tarangire National Park 

Our patient guide Elisa told us that impala’s have hair in the ears to break wind so they can hear better.  They have black socks on their feet that leaves a scent behind. This makes it easier for predators to find them but also keeps the herds together. Impala males stick together during non-rutting time but during rutting season, you will find one male impala with his harem of 15 + female impalas and the young. Male impalas will fight for their harem. 

Want to see  majestic impalas on your Journey To Africa Safari.

Get in touch //
Email – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Call – 1.877.558.6288

Photo of the week

Egyptian Geese at the Hippo Pool in Central Serengeti

Egyptian Geese at the Hippo Pool in Central Serengeti

When I was driving around Central Serengeti with my entertaining guide Makubi, we stopped at the Hippo Pool when we spotted this lovely family of Egyptian Geese.  So many beautiful birds on Safari.

Photo of the week

Photo from our June 2014 Safari in Serengeti //

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Leopard hanging out on a limp on the way to Dunia Camp in Moru Kopjes. June 2014 Safari.

A beautiful leopard was spotted on my way to Dunia Camp near Moru Kopjes on our Safari right before the heavy rainfall.

Leopard are usually solitary animals. They tend to hunt alone and are known to drag their prey on a tree limp to keep it away from other scavengers.  They are also maternal and will care for their young until they are ready to hunt on their own.

I was happy to spot a leopard in South Central Serengeti. My guide Reuben at Olakira Camp told me his colleage Baraka spotted a coupling leopard pair with an offspring close by in Northern Serengeti.  I missed it by a couple of hours – Reuben was on his way to Kogatende airstrip to come pick me up from Arusha.

There is always next time!

Come see these beautiful cats on Safari with Journey To Africa.

Get in touch //
Email – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Call – 1.877.558.6288