Take a Break from Game Driving … do some Walking.

A memorable experience to add to your game driving Safari / wildlife viewing adventure, is to do a walking Safari in the wild. The feeling of being out in the wildlife’s own territory brings about many emotions.

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Sally and I with our guide Ernest from Sand River Selous spotting an elephant herd. Pure Joy!

You have your hair raising experiences from healthy fear to pure joy to what you are witnessing.

Sally and I were walking in Selous when we spotted a pair of lions [yup, about 20 ft. away], a herd of elephants, or a lone hippo waddling outside the pond. In wild Ruaha, the tall grass always kept us on our toes. Healthy fear. There was a moment when we all experienced rainbows in the sky. A moment that I couldn’t capture on camera but will always remember.

Why go on a walking Safari?
Introduction to details.

  • Holding the plant and flowers and getting a lesson on its many uses by both humans and animals.
  • The little bugs, we are talking ants and dung beetles, that have a huge impact to the large environment. Watch out for siafu.
  • The animal and bird footprints that you get to identify and maybe follow.
  • The carcasses that leave behind a story.
  • Topography of the land! You get to walk on the ancient rocks or splash in the water dating hundreds of thousands years old.

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There are two types of walking Safari in Tanzania awaiting you.

A few hours of walking.
There are lodges + tented camps where you can go out for a few hours in the morning or afternoon. You will have a ranger and the walking guide, who may also be your main guide depending on their weapon skills. When on your walks, depending on the weather and the lodge + tented camp, you may come back to the lodge for breakfast or get surprised and find breakfast in the middle of nowhere.

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It does feel good to stretch your legs after spending time in the Safari vehicle. And who know, there may be a few hair raising moments on your walk.

Two to three days.
Time to get away from the main areas. There are a few places where we can accommodate this adventure. I have done a walking Safari inside Serengeti and truly enjoyed my time with Richard, my fantastic guide. Our partners on the ground have a special walking area designated for this adventure. You will not see a vehicle.

Tarangire and Selous have the fly camping option within the national park. Then we have areas around the parks, in our private concession areas. Our Alamana Camp in Loliondo area offers this great opportunity of truly being private, in both game driving as well as walking.

wilderness_tent_messYou start out from your main lodge and head out with a small crew who will cater to your delicious meals, set up your light wilderness tents with a cot, pillows and blankets, have shower tents close-by, bring your drinks while you are around the campfire, stoke your roaring fire … you know, basics.

The advantage of doing this. It’s Just You.  

Come on a walking Safari with us and immerse yourself with the wild in their own habitat.
We can help you with your Safari Plan.

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Get in touch via email – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Call us at 1.877.558.6288 or 713.592.6228.

Together, we can plan your Safari to Tanzania for the memory books.
Life worth Exploring. ™

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Weaver birds.

weaver_birds_selousOn my walking Safari with guide Hierbert from lovely Beho Beho in Selous Game Reserve, I had a fun time watching these black-headed weaver birds building their nests.

What I learnt was that the males do all the building of the elaborate nest. They will be buzzing and squeaking for days going back and forth picking up small branches and grass in hopes that their fancy nest production will attract the female weaver birds. Hierbert said the males will go as far as bringing a colorful leaf or flower to primp up the nest. Quite chivalrous of the male weaver bird don’t you think?

Once the female ‘approves’ of the nest, her home for the near future, she will help with the final female touches. The nest have a small entrance are usually built high up on the tree or around the water source. This hopefully will prevent predators from entering the nest.

A fun half an hour or so watching these weavers on my walking Safari with Beho Beho in Selous Game Reserve.

On a walking Safari, it’s about the little things. 

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Get in touch with us via email at Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Call us on our Toll Free No. at 1.877.558.6288 or 713.592.6228.

Together, we can plan your family Safari for the memory books. Life worth Exploring. ™

Back from my Safari.

I am back from my Safari in Tanzania. Sigh. The thing about going on a Safari is that as soon as you come back, you want to start planning your next Safari. I LoVe being on Safari.

Quick re-cap on my Safari where I had a few extra perks. I spent two days with professional guide Paul Oliver in the hot temperature ‘belly of the Earth’, from Lake Natron Tented Camp. The landscape here was stunning.  I thoroughly enjoyed learning more about the Rift Valley, the birds and their incredible long and perilous journey, general in-depth happenings in this Maasai region, details about other National Parks – I have a lot more to see in Tanzania – and so much more.

And there is a Safari brewing with Paul as the lead guide. Details coming up.

Sunset with Ol Doinyo Lengai in the background from Lake Natron Tented Camp, my first stop on my Safari.

In Ruaha, my client Sally was waiting for me. Oh what fun we had exploring this dense because of green season, cooler in temperature, full of wild flowers stunning Ruaha. Our guides Lorenzo and Leverd from Kwihala Camp were super fun as there was not much ‘visible’ game. We just ‘heard’ the hundreds of cats. More on green season Ruaha coming up.

Lorenzo with our ranger Chris took us on a walking Safari through the tall grasses and lush bushes – adrenaline pumping experience. We witnessed a rainbow in the clouds here – one for the memory books. Can not wait to come back and explore Ruaha in the dry season.

Sally Mefi

Sally and I in Selous on our walking Safari. Can you spot the wild animal?

I finished off with Selous Game Reserve. Green season again meant patience when going on game drives but Sally and I got to witness two male lions on our walking Safari. Heart beating.

I was looking forward to experiencing boating and it did not disappoint. Sally and I enjoyed the many birds and baboons – yes, baboons are so entertaining if you watch them closely for a long time – on the way to lovely Stiegler’s Gorge from Sand River Selous. I also got to spend time in Lake Tagalala and the hot springs before I was spoilt at stunning Beho Beho Camp.

I am in the middle of editing over 2000 pictures. Digital photography does make it easy to go click-crazy especially when I had my 70-300 mm f4-5.6L on my Canon camera body.

Dreaming of being back on Safari ….. soon.

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Make memories on your Journey To Africa Safari.

Get in Touch //
Email us – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Toll Free – 1.877.558.6288
Outside of US – 1.713.592.6228
Form – Request Information

My Safari 2015

My 2015 intentions were to enjoy more adventures.  Well, I am heading back to Tanzania and expanding my knowledge base. There is still so much to explore in lovely Tanzania. My Safari adventure will never stop.

On this Safari, I head first to my base in Northern Tanzania before I venture to Southern Tanzania.

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Lake Natron

My first Safari stop will be Lake Natron.  I have passed through Lake Natron so many times when flying to Serengeti. I am excited to be on the ground in this remote landscape. I am heading here with elite guide Paul Oliver.

I have known Paul for 14 + years. He has given me lots of advise over the years with Journey To Africa. I also started using Oliver’s Camp in Tarangire when it was run by him and Tati back in the early 2000. When it was run by Paul, it was a rustic little camp but having Paul and Tati share stories  by the campfire in the evening was priceless.

Being with Paul to wild Lake Natron should be an adventure. The rough roads, the dry, hot and humid conditions for walking, flamingo filled soda ash lake, off the beaten path encounters with the Maasai tribe, the amazing views of Ol Doinyo Lengai … I hope to come back with wild stories to share.

I will be spending two nights at Lake Natron Camp, an eco-friendly camp run by Ake Lindstrom, a Mt. Kilimanjaro climbing expert who has been on the mountain around 50 times.

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Walking in Ruaha

Then off to Ruaha National Park, the largest National Park in Tanzania. Ruaha has been everywhere in the travel news lately. Conde Nest, National Geographic to CN Traveller and more. Why I think? Daily flights, more luxury camps within the park boundaries and expert guiding both by vehicle and on foot is a major draw to this park.

I really enjoyed my Serengeti walking Safari and I am excited to be trying it out in Ruaha. I hope to see large buffalo herds, elephants, lots of cats and because I am going in March, birds should be plentiful. In March, the park is going to be lush, the green season, as opposed to yellow season which is from July to October.

I am also excited to explore Ruaha with my client Sally. Sally has been on two Safaris to Northern Tanzania with Journey To Africa. She is taking a group for an amazing Safari to Selous Game Reserve, Ruaha, Mahale Mountains and stunning Greystoke Camp, Tarangire and Serengeti in 2016. I know!

When I told her I am going to explore Ruaha and Selous, she jumped on board to come on a quick get-away. To say she loves being on Safari in Tanzania is an understatement.

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Sand River Selous

Sally and I will head to Selous Game Reserve, my final stop on this Safari. I have waited 10 + years to get to this game reserve. It has a lot of elements that would be a perfect combination to Northern Tanzania. Boating on the Rufiji River and it’s tributaries and the many lakes, fishing on the boat or the shores, lots more walking Safari and generally a slower pace of Safari.

From what my colleagues tell me, being in Selous means relaxing by the river and casual game drives as it is not all about the wildlife concentration of Northern Tanzania. A good extension to Northern Tanzania maybe or for the seasoned Tanzania Safari goer. I shall find out.

In Selous, I will be heading to Sand River Selous and then to Beho Beho Camp. Sand River Selous is a sister camp to Lamai Serengeti, one of my favorite camps in Northern Serengeti. Beho Beho Camp is by a lake and is known for its great walking guides and treehouse.

Want to see what I see? Follow me on Instagram. I will post Safari pictures from Tanzania whenever I have access. 

Next up, preparations for my Safari. What to pack on Safari? I am doing only carry-on. What camera and lens to take? I have some suggestions coming up. Leave a comment if you have any.

Want to join me next time? We can plan ahead for a Safari in 2016.

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Life worth Exploring. ™

Make memories on your Journey To Africa Safari.

Get in Touch //
Email us – Safari@JourneyToAfrica.com
Toll Free – 1.877.558.6288
Outside of US – 1.713.592.6228
Form – Request Information